Philipp Lachenmann: DELPHI Rationale

 

Dialogue with Science

Science makes an important contribution to the development of our society. In the public perception, however, it embodies not only progress but is also felt to be a threat to human safety and security. The more the sciences noticeably change the conditions of our lives, the more they are called upon to enter into a constructive dialogue with society. In order to enable citizens to actively participate in this discussion, it requires a broad science education and an understanding of scientific research. The Ernst Schering Foundation pursues these objectives through a variety of initiatives. It organizes and supports science lectures for a wider audience, holds public discussions and symposia on controversial scientific topics, and promotes science communication in Germany. As part of its programs on science education, it helps get children and young people excited about science at an early age.


Live Debate: What to Do When Kidneys, Livers and Hearts Are Getting Scarce?

09.03.2018, Berlin | While more than 10,000 people in Germany are desperately waiting for a donor organ, the number of organ donors decreases every year. In 2017, it was 797, the lowest number in twenty years. What are the reasons for people’s reluctance to donate organs? Is it due to a lack of education, advertising or trust in the system? Do we need new incentive systems or might new rules increase people’s willingness to donate? Are there alternative research approaches that could make human-to-human organ donations superfluous? These questions will be addressed by the platform “The Debate“ online at www.die-debatte.org and live on March 23, 2018, at 7 p.m., at the Zeiss-Großplanetarium in Berlin. Join us for the discussion!

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Visions of Synthetic Biology

16.02.2018, Berlin | Life is what you make it – this is the motto of synthetic biology. In its most radical projections, biological systems are assembled and redesigned to perform completely different functions: organisms that are able to detect and neutralize toxins, effectively fight cancer, and replace oil-based production with bio-based production. On March 15, 2018, at 7 p.m., the Young Academy, the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, and the Schering Stiftung co-host an evening lecture in Berlin with Dr. Petra Schaper-Rinkel from the Austrian Institute of Technology in Vienna. The innovation researcher talks about developments in synthetic biology, how society can co-create these developments, and what that means politically and socially.

Petra Schaper-Rinkel

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Digital Childhood – The Earlier, the Better?

26.01.2018, Berlin | Smartphones, tablets, computers, gaming consoles – children are confronted with digital media at an increasingly early age and on a daily basis. Scientists have only recently begun to study how children grow up, live, and learn in the digital age. To what extent does early media use influence child development? When is media consumption harmful, and where does it offer opportunities? What can parents do right, and where can they go wrong? How and from what age should digital media be used in kindergartens and schools? These questions will be addressed by the platform “The Debate”: online at www.die-debatte.org and live on February 8, at 7 p.m., at the Haus der Wissenschaft in Braunschweig. Join us for the discussion!

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Lecture Series Cell Communication

02.02.2018, Berlin | In the 2017/2018 winter term, the Integrative Research Institute of Life Sciences at HU Berlin invites the public to a colloquium on “Cell Communication.” The colloquium features six lectures by high-profile international scientists who draw on their current research to present the entire spectrum of cell communication, from cells communicating across long distances to direct cell-to-cell communication. Communication can take place between cells of the same type as well as been different cell types of an organism or different organisms. On March 1, 2018, at 4 p.m., Dr. Shelly Tzlil from the Technion in Haifa, Israel, will give the fourth lecture in the series and talk about Mechanical communication in cardiac cell beating.”

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Digital Salon: App’s Anatomy

03.01.2018, Berlin | For information on possible side effects, please consult your doctor or your smartphone: The market offers more and more health apps: analyzing our blood sugar level, tracking the menstrual cycle, offering aid to asthma patients. They help you find a doctor nearby or provide information about drugs. Chronically ill patients especially benefit from the “doctor in the smartphone.” The user data can be harnessed for comprehensive analyses; they can even trigger an alarm in case of an emergency. Are general practitioners becoming obsolete? Do digital tools turn us into hypochondriacs? How do patients deal with the new sources of information? What data should we share? And how can we guarantee medical quality and data privacy? These and other questions will be addressed by a Digital Salon entitled “App’s Anatomy,” which will be held at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society on January 31, at 7 p.m.

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Science in the Dinosaur Hall 2017

Do we need playgrounds for our livestock? How do we feed 7 billion people? And are insects the better flower breeders? As part of the 2017 lecture series "Science in the Dinosaur Hall" at the Natural History Museum in Berlin, scientists from disciplines as different as immunology, agricultural economics or farm animal research open up new perspectives, offer solutions to global problems, and outline new visions for the 21st century.

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Gene editing: On the way to the super plant?

24.10.2017, Berlin | More productive plants to combat the hunger in the world? Plants that protect themselves against insects? Robust plant types that defy climate change? Genetic engineering promises to make all of this possible. Thanks to the discovery of genetic “scissors” like CRISPR/Cas9, plant breeding is currently experiencing a revolution, for the method is fast, precise, and significantly less expensive than previous methods. But how exactly do genetic scissors work? What new plant types can be cultivated through genome editing? And are the new breeding methods really suited to making more precise interventions? Do we need new regulations to minimize the risks to our health and the environment? These questions will be addressed by the platform “Die Debatte” (The Debate) – online at www.die-debatte.org and live at Schloss Herrenhausen in Hanover on November 1, 2017, at 7 p.m.

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Digital Salon: A Soft Spot for Cyborgs

22.05.2017, Berlin | Smart robot hands, artificial legs, printable organs: Are implants the panacea of the future? Where does 3D printing lead us, and what are the legal consequences? These and other questions will be addressed during a Digital Salon entitled “A Soft Spot for Cyborgs,” which will be held at the Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society on June 28, 2017, at 7 p.m.

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Lecture Series: Life in Numbers - with Rob Phillips

04.10.2017, Berlin | During the 2017 summer term, the Integrative Research Institute of Life Sciences at HU Berlin hosts the colloquium “Life in Numbers.” The colloquium features lectures by outstanding international scientists who present their current research in the field of quantitative biology. On October 12, 2017, at 4 p.m., Rob Phillips from the California Institute of Technology, USA, will give a talk entitled Drunken Sailors, Coin Flips and How to Read Genomes.” He will show how simple tools from statistical physics can be used to predict the level of expression of different genes, and describe precision measurements used to test those predictions. In addition, he will describe unexpected ways of using the physics of information transfer first developed at Bell Labs for thinking about telephone communications to try to decipher the meaning of the regulatory features of genomes.

Rob Phillips

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Lecture Series: Life in Numbers - with Johan Elf

04.09.2017, Berlin | During the 2017 summer term, the Integrative Research Institute of Life Sciences (IRI) at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin hosts the colloquium “Life in Numbers.” The colloquium features lectures by outstanding international scientists who present their current research in the field of quantitative biology. On September 7, at 4 p.m., Johan Elf from Uppsala University, Sweden, will give a talk entitled Probing intracellular kinetics at single molecule sensitivity." Elf is particularly interested in how key steps in transcription, translation and replication are regulated in the intracellular environment and at what level of physical detail these processes need to be modelled to describe their function in the living cell. To answer these questions, he uses state-of-the-art single molecule microscopy methods to study kinetics and diffusion in living cells.


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